Will Higher Prices for Coyote Fur Do For Deer What Wildlife Managers Won’t Do?

Share on TwitterSubmit to StumbleUponDigg ThisShare via email

Maine and some other states have too many coyotes. As a result, in some of those states, like Maine, too many coyotes is contributing to a drastic reduction in whitetail deer populations. Too many predators combined with a couple of bad winters and wildlife management programs that protect large predators rather than control them, have all contributed to the problem.

I reported just the other day that the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) had somehow dug up $50,000 to pay expenses to hire trained hunters and trappers to go to specified deer wintering areas and kill coyotes. However, so far, spending $9,500 has only seen the death of 52 coyotes, or about $180 apiece.

Last night I sent out an email to a small contingency of Maine hunter/trapper experts. From one of those people I got back the following response which was not directly related to the question I asked.

Tom,

If coyote prices stay where there at the trappers will have them harvested to there lowest numbers since coming to Maine. One trapper in Princeton got $92 a piece for two of his yotes and overall had over a $50 average. I predict we will see a big difference in two years on our deer herd.

I have to admit this caught me off guard. I am not a trapper but I do fully support the activity as I see trapping and hunting as both integral parts of wildlife management. I had no idea the price of coyote fur had risen so much. Usually the comments are that it was difficult to get people out to hunt and trap coyotes because the fur prices were worth nothing, rendering the effort a waste of time.

To help me out, another reader sent me links to information about fur prices. The Maine Trappers Association (MTA) has early season fur prices from different regions posted. And at the website, Trapping Today, there exist extensive reports on fur prices to include one report that lists auction prices for coyotes running between $63 and $69 dollars.

I had suggested in that earlier report that perhaps Maine could better spend what little money they had and just pay out the $50,000 in bounty fees of $100 per coyote on a first come, first served basis. Imagine if you will if coyote prices remained at or above $50 a pelt in conjunction with a $50 bounty? At those prices, I would have to agree with the one gentleman who predicted that there would be a big difference in Maine’s deer herd after a couple years.

If coyote fur prices were to remain at very high levels, this event all by itself would accomplish what no fish and game department is willing to do or has the ability to do.

Bring on high fur prices!

Tom Remington